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15% FYUP impact on admissions: Assocham

June 27, 2014


New Delhi : The standoff between the UGC and the Delhi University over the controversial four-year undergraduate programme may have ended, but many aspirants put off by the delay in admissions are opting for other universities.

According an Assocham report, many students have started looking for “secure and other options” in other universities like Indraprastha University, Jamia Millia Islamia, Indira Gandhi National Open University and private institutions.

“In case, the tussle between the University Grants Commission (UGC) and the DU top authority had not been resolved soon, the DU aspirants would been forced to opt for private institutions like Apeejay, Amity International, Rai University, Jaganath Institute of Management Studies (JIMS), Manav Rachna,” the Assocham paper said.

Although there are no estimates of numbers, many students are believed to have either taken admission elsewhere or have moved back to their states.

“The current controversy is likely to impact this year’s admission process by 10-15 per cent. The inclination towards foreign universities would increase among those who are relatively well-off,” the paper asserted.

Noting that the “mess” has left many DU hopefuls, especially those from other cities, in the lurch, the Assocham paper stated that nearly 55 per cent of students aspiring to get admission in the Delhi University hail from the Northeast, Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Jammu and Kashmir.

As per the Assocham estimate, more than 22 per cent of the DU applicants are from Uttar Pradesh, followed by Bihar with 18 per cent, West Bengal with 15 per cent and the Northeast with 15 per cent.

Commenting on the “unsavoury developments,” Assocham secretary-general D.S. Rawat said thousands of students felt they had been caught in a tug-of-war between the DU and the University Grants Commission.

“In the bargain, some of the private universities in and around the Delhi-NCR would be benefited.”

As per data, over 2.5 lakh students apply every year to pursue undergraduate courses in general streams, engineering, medical and other professional and job-oriented courses such as mass communication and fashion and interior design.

At present, there are approximately 75,000 students under the FYUP. Due to delay in admission, many parents and their wards from outside Delhi have to spend extra time and money on travel and lodging in Delhi. This year, the Delhi University received nearly 8,000 to 10,000 applications from foreign applicants. The standoff has cost India its international image, points out the paper.

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